Pour Over Coffee Guide

Pour Over Method, A Great Cup of Coffee.

Pour over coffee has been around before the 1900s in Europe. This method of brewing coffee is similar to an automatic drip coffee maker, except the water is manually poured over the coffee grinds. To perfect your pour over cup of coffee you need to have the right filter size. The filter size varies based on the brand of your device. The correct filter size is very important for the extraction coffee. Last, but most importantly you will need freshly ground Passport Coffee. The grind should be at a drip setting.

The incredibly popular way of manually brewing coffee with a kettle and carafe, common in coffee houses around the world. Carafe systems like a Chemex or Cone Drippers like the Hario V60 are the most popular. Each one may have a slightly different design, but they all use the same basic brewing method.

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Check out our easy to follow steps on brewing pour over coffee!

What you Need:

Pour Over Brewing Device

Kettle

Scale ( prefered)

Filters

Passport Coffee

Recommended grind: Drip aka “medium-coarse”

Step 1: Heat water to 195-205 degrees Fahrenheit, or just before the water comes to a boil if you don’t have a thermometer or temperature controlled kettle. (Water boils at 212°) Use the same 1 Cup water: 1 Cup coffee ratio.

Step 2. Rinse the filter with hot water before use.  A clean filter allows for the purest flavor. Make sure to use the proper size filter.

Step 3: Recommended grind: Drip aka “medium-coarse”

Step 4: Measure the coffee. The ratio is 1 tablespoons (or 15 grams) every 8 oz of water. The water for pour over must be very hot, but not boiling when you are pouring it over the coffee grinds. The easiest way to get the water at the correct temperature is to heat the water on a stove until it just reaches boiling point. Remove the kettle from the stove and wait 30 seconds. 

Step 5: Slowly start to pour hot water in a spiral motion from center to the edge for the filter. Pour just enough water on the grounds to dampen them without causing them to float. No coffee should drip into the carafe yet, just enough to saturate the grounds.  You will see the grinds begin to swell, rise and bubble. This allows a process called “blooming” in which the grounds release gasses and appear to expand. This takes 30-45 seconds.

(Tip: The water for pour over must be very hot, but not boiling when you are pouring it over the coffee grinds. The easiest way to get the water at the correct temperature is to heat the water on a stove until it just reaches boiling point. Remove the kettle from the stove and wait 30 seconds.)

Step 6: Resume slowly pouring water over the grounds in the same spiral pattern. Do not overflow the filter with too much water, causing the grounds to float and leave under extracted grounds on the sides of the filter. Brewing should take 4-5 minutes total. Some designs do well with a slow continuous pour, others prefer incremental periods of pouring.

Enjoy!

“Pour Over is viewed as the purist’s way to brew coffee among some industry circles, because it allows you to control so many variables and fine tune each brew. You can adjust flavor and brew time by changing the water temperature, pouring speed, grind size, etc.”

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Things to Watch For:
– Pouring in one spot unevenly extracts the coffee and makes the drink inconsistent.
– Pouring too quickly can flood the filter, forcing under extracted coffee through or overflowing the carafe.
– Not pouring the water within the recommended time of 4-5 minutes changes the flavor.
– Not allowing the coffee to bloom causes CO2 to be trapped inside your drink and the oils can not properly extract all their flavor.

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